Show details

Listings are for East Coast. For local listings, Enter zip code   or   Sign in

How the States Got Their Shapes

Brian Unger explores how America's States got their borders and how they continue to change today. 

Crew:
Brian Unger (Host), Sean Gallagher (Executive Producer), Abby Greensfelder (Executive Producer), Ann Carroll (Executive Producer), David Mckillop (Executive Producer), Paul Cabana (Executive Producer)

7/8/15
07:00 AM
"Mouthing Off"  Why southern accents didn't exist until after the Civil War; California athletes coin new words; pop versus soda; an accent that may cause New York to break up.  (Repeat) HISTORY
7/8/15
08:00 AM
"Church and States"  Could Utah have been bigger than Texas?; how religion shattered New England into little shapes; the Civil War's origin in Kansas.  (Repeat) HISTORY
7/8/15
09:00 AM
"A Boom With a View"  How Green Bay helped carve the border with Canada; what football has to do with fur; is North Carolina the real Golden State; why everyone should move to North Dakota.  (Repeat) HISTORY
7/8/15
10:00 AM
"Living on the Edge"  Behind blank spots like Area 51; what possessed the citizens of Key West to secede from Florida; old missile bunkers turned into dream homes; a county that was left off Georgia's quarter.  (Repeat) HISTORY
7/8/15
11:00 AM
"Culture Clash"  World War II preserves the shape of California; part of Maine becomes northern Massachusetts; Florida's cowboy tradition.  (Repeat) HISTORY
How the States Got Their Shapes

Premise
The United States is like a giant jigsaw puzzle, with each state having a uniquely shaped border to fit into its neighboring states. Americans are familiar with each state's shape, but how did those shapes come about? That's what this series, hosted by former ``Daily Show'' correspondent Brian Unger, explains. Unger crisscrosses the country talking to local experts and everyday people in search of the stories behind the boundaries. Religion, transportation and Mother Nature are just a few of the factors that have caused the states' borders to evolve over time, some of which may be continuing to evolve.

Current cast
Brian Unger

Program data from Tribune Media Services, Inc.